INDO DEFENCE – Jakarta, Indonesia

Coverage in SADJ
INDO DEFENCE 2008
INDO DEFENCE 2010

Location
Halim Perdanakusuma (military) Airport
Jakarta, Indonesia

Website
www.indodefence.com

Contact
(Go to the website for worldwide contacts)
Mr. Benny Dwiatmadji, Project Manager
PT. Napindo Media Ashatama
Jl. Kelapa Sawit XIV Blok M1 No.10
Bilimun, Pondok Kelapa
Jakarta Timur
13450 Indonesia
Tel: +62-21 8650962, 8644756
Fax: +62-21 8650963

Next Show
November 2-5, 2016

Focus
Indo Defence is a military only show with weapons, vehicles, electronics and kit, and there are many exhibitors from around the world. There are a lot of indigenous manufacturers and designers as well as military academies that exhibit. This provides a window into the local manufacturing partnerships and purchasing opportunities.

Dress
November in South East Asia is hot and humid and Indo Defence is right after the yearly monsoon season is ending. Dress should be modest, professional and business-like, but take the humidity into account or be uncomfortable. Suits should be lightweight.

Hotel Hints
Almost all US, Euro, and Asian hotel chains are heavily represented in Jakarta. You should have no trouble finding a room compatible with your hotel programs, as well as comfort needs.

Power & Plug Types
Electricity is 220v, 50 cycle, in the European manner. Plugs are the two round-pronged European ungrounded style; some U.S. two blade style may be found. Phone jacks are Australian style but in hotels are usually standard RJ-11 type (U.S.).

Country Warnings
There has been a lot of anti-Western as well as terrorist activity in parts of Indonesia. (http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_918.html) The U.S. government issues travel advisories, and these should be taken seriously by travelers. SADJ in no way wants to discourage our readers from traveling to other countries, but U.S. and Euro citizens in particular should be informed and aware of their surroundings. The Indonesian government has done a lot to keep the situation under control. Our readers are usually world traveled and can understand the following: pay attention, think through where you are going, keep your profile low, don’t be too routine, and “watch your six.”

Cultural Hints
Indonesians are a very social people and have both South East Asian and Muslim customs built into that society. Lack of space prevents SADJ from presenting a good primer, but an excellent resource for business people can be found online. (www.ediplomat.com/np/cultural_etiquette/ce_id.htm)

Tipping
Is not considered to be necessary, but it is clearly expected. Taxi drivers, waitstaff, bellhops, skycaps, all seem fairly accustomed to tips, but not excessively so. Note the currency exchange, seeing that 10,000 Rupiah was approximately 1 U.S. Dollar. Bellhops and Skycaps generally get 3,000 to 5,000 Rupiah per bag, taxis are rounded up to the next major bill, restaurants at 10%, but check to see if “service charge” is included, frequently it will be. Be sure to keep plenty of smaller bills – 1,000, 5,000, 10,000 – because no one “ever” has change.

Currency Type
The Indonesian Rupiah is the standard currency used. At the time of printing, the Rupiah was USD $0.000098501 each. Roughly figure 10,100 Rupiah per U.S. Dollar (1,000 Rupiah is a “Dime” in U.S. Speak), one Euro would be about 14,400 Rupiah, and the British Pound Sterling would be about 16,700 Rupia. Get up to date info at www.xe.com/ucc.

Getting Around
Trains are crowded but work very well in the main islands but taxis and cars hired at your hotel will work best around town. Unless you are a seasoned traveler, public buses, although an adventure, may not be safe enough – more for whether you get where you are going on time than related to bodily harm. Most of the western chains of car rentals are available, an International Driver’s License will probably be required, and frequently they want to keep your passport as collateral. “Just say No” to that. Driving is on the left in the British manner, and many traffic rules are taken as “suggestions” by the Indonesian drivers – including driving on the left. SADJ suggests hiring cars at the hotel for local travel.

Military Museums
There is one absolute “Must-See” military museum in Jakarta area in regard to small arms. It has amazing dioramas on the first floor, but once you find the basement full of small arms, and the back yard full of cannon, mortar, recoilless, vehicles and aircraft, it will be worth the trip.

Museum Satria Mandala
(Armed Forces Museum)
14-16 Jalan Gatot Subroto
Kuningan Timur Village
Jakarta Pusat, 12710
Phone: +62 21 522 7949
SADJ visits Museum Satria Mandala (V2N1)

Tourism
Indonesia is an Archipelago with over 13,000 islands, and these can present diverse environments of almost every type. It is best to do the research well ahead of time; some of the best diving in the world is in the islands.